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Media Releases

Changes ahead for Kiwi Regional Airlines

One of New Zealand’s most established airlines has announced that it has purchased Kiwi Regional Airlines’ Saab 340A aircraft and will absorb the aircraft and offer employment to the majority of Kiwi Regional Airlines full time staff and absorb them into its operations from the start of August this year.

Air Chathams has been in existence for over 30 years, and runs a 5-aircraft operation with scheduled services between the Chathams Islands and Auckland, Wellington and Christchurch as well as a regular scheduled service between Whakatane and Auckland.

It has previously announced it would fill the gap left by Air New Zealand’s withdrawal of services between Whanganui and Auckland, starting on 1st August 2016. It had planned to use an 18-seat Metroliner, but will now use Kiwi Regional’s 34-seat Saab 340 on this route .

Kiwi Regional Airlines will continue to run its scheduled services until 30th July, and will then run the Whanganui to Auckland service for Air Chathams using Kiwi Regional’s Air Operating Certificate until Air Chathams can move the aircraft onto its own AOC.

Kiwi Regional Airlines passengers booked on flights after midday on the 30th of July will receive full refunds, or be offered alternative travel on flights before that date. All of Kiwi Regional Airlines’ charters flights with school groups in August and September will still operate.

Air Chathams CEO Craig Emeny said, “We are delighted to have bought Kiwi Regional Airlines’ Saab 340.”

“The aircraft is a respected aircraft type in New Zealand and has been very well maintained. Kiwi’s pilots and engineers will make a welcome addition to the Air Chathams family.”

Kiwi Regional Airlines CEO Ewan Wilson said Kiwi had “a choice to either expand by adding a second aircraft to our own fleet, guaranteeing reliability of service, and splitting the very high compliance costs; or be absorbed into a larger player.”

“From my point of view I am pleased our aircraft and flight staff will become part of the Air Chathams operation. We have had a formal maintenance agreement with Air Chathams since the start, and this will be an extension of that relationship.”


New Kiwi Regional Airlines Director

Kiwi Regional Airlines has announced that Guy Domett, a major shareholder in the airline, has become a director of the company, effective from 1st April 2016.

Mr Domett is an accountant by profession and brings decades of financial expertise to the board.

“I have thoroughly enjoyed working with Guy in his role as Chief Financial Controller for the airline and look forward to his involvement at the  governance board level,” said Kiwi’s CEO Ewan Wilson.


Kiwi Regional Airlines to raise funds for second aircraft

Kiwi Regional Airlines has confirmed that it plans to raise up to $2 million to enable it to add a second aircraft to its fleet, and was likely to use a crowdfunding platform to do so – a New Zealand first.

The additional aircraft would be a Saab 340 QC, to be used to develop the lucrative passenger and freight charter markets and, as a backup for both planned and unplanned maintenance of its primary aircraft.

There are no plans for the additional aircraft to be used to either add capacity to existing routes or add additional destinations.

Kiwi CEO Ewan Wilson said, “Over the last 12 months Kiwi Regional has worked very hard to get its certification (in fact it has paid over $167,405 in fee’s to the New Zealand CAA) and has had a rewarding first four and a half months of operations.”

“While airlines are inherently risky businesses, they can also be highly successful.”

“New legislation enables small amounts of equity to be raised via crowdfunding platforms, and although a lot of the detail is yet to be formalised, I find the idea of a community of New Zealand shareholders being a part of Kiwi Regional Airlines quite exciting.”

Kiwi also recently announced the addition of a further return flight between Tauranga, Nelson and Dunedin each week, with flights between Nelson and Dunedin on Thursdays and on the weekend now going via Christchurch.

The airline will be operating 32 flights, seven days per week from 14th May onwards.


Regional centres a winner in Kiwi Regional Airlines’ expansion

Kiwi Regional Airlines has announced an expansion of its regional air services from the 14th of May.

The airline has added new direct flights between Nelson and Tauranga, more flights between Nelson and Dunedin, and twice-weekly connections between Christchurch, Dunedin and Nelson.

From 14th May, Kiwi’s air services will include:

  • Daily return services between Dunedin and Nelson
  • Daily return services between Nelson and either Hamilton (4) or Tauranga (3)
  • Return services four times a week between Hamilton, Nelson and Dunedin
  • Return services three times a week between Tauranga, Nelson and Dunedin
  • Twice weekly return services connecting Christchurch with both Nelson and Dunedin

CEO Ewan Wilson said Kiwi was “providing regional air services that the travelling public is demanding.”

“We are pleased that residents in many regional centres have responded so well to our airline.”

“In the last 6 months, we have sold well over 10,000 seats, and we will continue to look at how we can best meet regional New Zealand’s needs.”

Fares: Single-sector (leg) start from $99 one way; multi-sector (leg) fares from $169.


Kiwi flying with full load from Tauranga today

Tauranga has welcomed its newest airline partner in the best possible way, with a completely full load on its first-ever flight out of the coastal city tomorrow, bound for Nelson.

Kiwi CEO Ewan Wilson said sales of seats on the twice-weekly flights to Nelson and on to Dunedin had been “excellent”.

“Tauranga is performing well for us against all our other routes, which is fantastic, given we have yet to fly in or out of the city.”

“Our experience highlights the need for affordable, direct, inter-regional air services in New Zealand, and vindicates our decision to add the Bay of Plenty as one of our key regions,” he said.

Mr Wilson said Kiwi’s SAAB340A aircraft was scheduled to arrive in from Nelson at 11.15am, departing 50 minutes later at 12.05pm.

He welcomed members of the public coming to Tauranga Airport to view the aircraft from the terminal.

Flights to Nelson with Kiwi depart at 12.05pm every Tuesday and Saturday, flying on to Dunedin on Tuesdays. On both Tuesdays and Saturdays, the aircraft flies up from Dunedin and Nelson to Tauranga.


Kiwi Regional Airlines has a new investor

2 Cheap Cars has sold its shares in Kiwi Regional Airlines to Mr and Mrs Andrew and Anne King of Hamilton.

Andrew is a successful entrepreneur – his portfolio of investments include Kings Finance and Kings Cars in Hamilton.

Mr King will not be a KRA director, or part of the management team at Kiwi Regional Airlines.

However we are delighted to have him as a shareholder.


Regional air connections extended with Barrier/Kiwi Alliance

Two of New Zealand’s growing regional airlines have announced an ‘agency alliance’ that will extend affordable air services to their existing customers.

Barrier Air, currently flying routes between Auckland, Kaitaia, North Shore and Great Barrier Island, is extending it’s services from 8th February south to Hamilton on a daily basis.

Kiwi Regional Airlines passengers, flying routes between Nelson, Dunedin and Hamilton will be able to connect in Hamilton with Barrier Air flights to Auckland, and on to Great Barrier Island, North Shore or Kaitaia around midday on Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays, starting 15th February.

Passengers booking on Kiwi flights to Hamilton will be able to ‘add on’ a connecting Barrier Air flight to one of these destinations at a concessionary rate; and Barrier Air passengers will be able to land in Hamilton, and transfer to a connecting Kiwi flight to Nelson and Dunedin.

In a joint statement from the airlines, Kiwi CEO Ewan Wilson and Barrier CEO Mike Foster said they were “very pleased to be able to help ordinary kiwis living in regional areas to fly from north to south, and vice versa, on fully regional services.”

Mr Foster said the NZ Civil Aviation Authority was in the process of certifying his airline’s new route between Auckland and Hamilton, following a proving flight on 28th January.

“We want Hamilton passengers to be able to continue flying to Auckland when Air New Zealand stops that service on 7th February, and we want to give all regional passengers more choice and better access to our services in the north.”

Mr Wilson said he was “happy that we can offer new destinations through Barrier Air that were very difficult to access in the past.”

“Imagine a Dunedin couple deciding to try something new by flying through Hamilton to Great Barrier Island for a week away from it all, at a very affordable price.

“Or for the grandkids in North Shore to be able to fly from the local airfield all the way to visit the grandparents in Nelson, without having to brave the horrendous Auckland city traffic and airport parking fees!”

Each airline’s reservations staff will be able to act as ‘agents’ for the other airline’s flights, with tickets for the new connections due to go on sale next week. Both CEO’s explained that this agreement is not a codeshare service but an agreement to sell each other seats with each separate tickets but coordinated schedule.


Kiwi announces new direct air services from Nelson to Tauranga and Dunedin

Kiwi Regional Airlines has announced a new twice-weekly return connection for Tasman region residents to Tauranga and the Bay of Plenty region, with an additional Tuesday service to Dunedin to boost the current four return flights per week.

From 15th February, Kiwi will fly on a Tuesday and Saturday mid morning to Tauranga, returning early afternoon.

At the same time an extra Tuesday connection with Dunedin will start, bringing to five the number of return flights per week with that city.

Tickets from Nelson-Tauranga will be priced competitively, starting from $99 one-way, as will tickets for the Nelson-Dunedin and existing Nelson-Hamilton services.

Bookings for the flights are open now.

Kiwi CEO Ewan Wilson said “the airline’s first month of operation has taught us a lot about regional New Zealand’s travel preferences.”

“There is a high proportion of our passengers ‘visiting family and friends’ , and with the Bay of Plenty’s population around the quarter million mark, there are a lot of family connections between Nelson and that region.”

“Residents from Nelson and the surrounding region have proved to have a good appetite for affordable travel direct to other regions.”

“Avoiding the expensive and tiring bottlenecks at Wellington airport have been a big factor in Nelsonian’s decisions to travel with us,” he said.

Mr Wilson said his airline’s executive “had considered other North Island connections such as Hawkes Bay and Taranaki, but a combination of lack of facilities and the high Bay of Plenty potential had tipped the balance Tauranga’s way.”

“We will be looking elsewhere in future, but right now our hands are full with our successful Dunedin-Nelson-Hamilton flights, with the Tauranga connection only two months away.”


Kiwi announces new air connections from Tauranga direct to Nelson and Dunedin

Kiwi Regional Airlines has announced a new twice-weekly direct air connection for Bay of Plenty residents to Nelson, with the service also connecting on to Dunedin one day a week.

From 15th February, Kiwi will fly on a Tuesday Dunedin-Nelson-Tauranga and return, on a ‘same plane’ service with a brief 25-minute stop in Nelson for passengers travelling between Dunedin and Tauranga, or vice-versa.

On Saturdays, Kiwi will operate a Nelson-Tauranga-Nelson return service around the middle of the day.

Tickets from Tauranga-Nelson direct will be priced very competitively, starting from $99 one-way, while Tauranga-Dunedin tickets will start at $169.

Bookings for the flights are open now.

Kiwi CEO Ewan Wilson said “the airline’s first month of operation has taught us a lot about regional New Zealand’s travel preferences.”

“There is a high proportion of our passengers ‘visiting family and friends’ , and with the Bay of Plenty’s population around the quarter million mark, there are a lot of family connections between this area and the South Island.”

“The direct flights to Nelson make it much easier for both leisure and corporate travellers wanting to avoid lengthy and tiring stops in the expensive Wellington and Auckland airports.”

Mr Wilson said his airline’s executive “had considered other North Island connections such as Hawkes Bay and Taranaki, but a combination of lack of facilities and the high Bay of Plenty potential had tipped the balance Tauranga’s way.”

“We are also aware that other larger airlines have ignored the air travel needs of Bay of Plenty residents, either missing them entirely, or forcing them to travel through Auckland and Wellington to get anywhere.”

“Our region to region Dunedin-Nelson-Hamilton flights have been successful right from the start, and we expect the Tauranga-Nelson-Dunedin connection to also be as successful.”


Kiwi announces new Dunedin air connection to Tauranga and extra Nelson service

Kiwi Regional Airlines has announced a new twice-weekly connection for Otago/Southland residents with Tauranga and the Bay of Plenty region, with an additional Tuesday service to Nelson to boost the current four flights per week.

From 15th February, Kiwi will fly on a Tuesday and Saturday morning in a ‘same plane’ service to Tauranga, via Nelson. The aircraft will be on the ground for 25 minutes in Nelson, making a total flight time of just over 3 hours.

Tickets from Dunedin-Tauranga will be priced competitively, starting from $169 one-way.

Bookings for the flights are open now.

Passengers will be able to return from Tauranga direct to Dunedin on Tuesdays only, at this point.

Kiwi CEO Ewan Wilson said, “The airline’s first month of operation has taught us a lot about regional New Zealand’s travel preferences.”

“There is a high proportion of our passengers ‘visiting family and friends’, and with the Bay of Plenty’s population around the quarter million mark, there are a lot of family connections between there and the south.”

“The extra connection and earlier flight times to Nelson make it easier for regular short visits between Dunedin and Nelson, and with return flights on Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday and Friday, easier for the corporate sector to plan single day visits during the working week.”

Mr Wilson said his airline’s executive “had considered other North Island connections such as Hawkes Bay and Taranaki, but a combination of lack of facilities and the high Bay of Plenty potential had tipped the balance Tauranga’s way.”

“We will be looking elsewhere in future, but right now our hands are full with our successful Dunedin-Nelson-Hamilton flights, with the Tauranga connection only two months away.”


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